Archive for the ‘Milwaukee Journal Sentinel’ category

Segregation’s High Cost

June 2, 2017

“Housing policy is school policy.” That lesson has stuck with me over the years.

In 2001, I was one of the organizers of a land-use  conference — “Nolen in the New Century,” named for pioneer city designer John Nolen — that brought David Rusk to Madison. Rusk, the former mayor of Albuquerque, was a leading voice in advocating for a metropolitan vision for cities.

In particular, he drew a clear line linking high-poverty neighborhoods and the academic failure of poor kids. And–this was critical–improved performance when poor kids were raised in middle-class neighborhoods.

Rusk’s Cities Without Suburbs, the Congressional Quarterly proclaimed, was “the Bible of the regionalism movement.” A subsequent book, Inside Game/Outside Game, argued that regional land-use and tax  policies were more critical to turning around failing neighborhoods than anti-poverty programs.

As for housing patterns and educational success, he wrote in the Nov. 23, 2001 Isthmus:

Why should you be concerned about concentrated poverty in Madison and Dane County rather than just poverty in general? High poverty neighborhoods breed crime. Property values typically fall in high poverty neighborhoods. However, the greatest impact is on the education of children.

Over the last 35 years, educational research has consistently shown that the greatest factors affecting student outcomes are the income and educational level of a child’s parents followed closely by the same factors for the parents of a child’s classmates. “The educational resources provided by a child’s fellow students,” sociologist James Coleman wrote, “are more important for his achievement than are the resources provided by the school board.”

Skip ahead 16 years. Rusk’s insight has been mightily bolstered by the groundbreaking research of Raj Chetty and other economists now associated with the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality. In  a nutshell, they found that the earlier poor kids moved from high-poverty neighborhoods into middle-class surroundings, the better they fared in life.

This prompted me to argue in an opinion column in the Journal Sentinel,that the hyper-segregation of  Milwaukee’s poor has had a ruinous impact on children and undermined not just the metropolitan economy but the Wisconsin economy. I wrote:

Yet in Milwaukee this research — the concrete finding that expanded housing choice can ameliorate poverty — is largely ignored. My take on why: The poverty discussion in Milwaukee has been stunted by the decades-old battle that pits powerful conservative advocates of school vouchers against the once powerful liberal defenders of public education.

Both sides seem satisfied with keeping the focus on the economically and racially isolated high-poverty neighborhoods. Barely a word is voiced about the social, educational and economic benefits of spreading affordable- and subsidized- rental housing throughout the metro area.

You can find my column here.

Here’s an explanation of why the Chetty research is important.

This is the breakthrough study by Chetty.

And here’s what Rusk wrote in Isthmus.

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Stronger UWM=Stronger Wisconsin

July 11, 2016

Sometimes one story leads to another. My Isthmus piece on the critical role of the UW System in rebuilding the Wisconsin economy got me thinking about the importance of urban universities in anchoring  prosperous metropolitan regions.

I make the case in this Journal Sentinel opinion column that a bigger state  investment in UW-Milwaukee would be a key ingredient in revitalizing Milwaukee.

A strong Milwaukee is good for us all — Madison, the Milwaukee suburbs and the state as a whole. “You can’t move the state forward economically unless Milwaukee and southeastern Wisconsin are leading the pack,” as former commerce secretary Bill McCoshen puts it.

Indeed, most prosperous metro regions — the Austins and Seattles of the nation — are usually enriched by strong central cities, research shows. The weakest — the Clevelands and Milwaukees — are hobbled by weak central cities.

Look no farther than Minnesota, which has soared ahead of the Badger state. Our median income of $52,622 a year is almost $9,000 less than our sister state’s. The contrasting impact of Minnapolis-St.Paul’s muscular economy to Milwaukee’s lingering Rust Belt decline is the key reason for the prosperity gap.

 

To read more on the history and important role of urban universities, please go here.

Advice For Democrats

April 6, 2015

David Haynes’ column in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel got me thinking about the need for political realignment in Wisconsin. The paper’s editorial page editor recounted the dismal electoral standing of the Wisconsin Democratic Party and argued the faltering Dems need to rethink and rebuild their party.

I offer my two cents in a guest column in the Journal Sentinel:

First, dial back the vitriol. The hatred and contempt [the Democrats] show for Gov. Scott Walker has been repudiated by the voters. Instead, they should stick to the issues. Look to the future. Embrace the millennials. Champion the tech sector. Celebrate start-ups and entrepreneurs. Support the Ubers of the sharing economy. Get real about unions. Give tough love (and financial support) to public education. Welcome immigrants. Offer a helping hand to the poor.

Most of all, accept the necessity of change. Wisconsin hasn’t. Too often, our political and economic leaders act as if they’re historical re-enactors at Old World Wisconsin. They refight the old battles when the world — and the economy — has moved on.

I made many of these points in a story (see below) that appeared earlier in Isthmus. To read more of my Journal Sentinel piece, please go here.

The I-94 Road to Prosperity

June 13, 2012

Politically, Madison and Milwaukee are two Democratic peas in a pod. But culturally  they are like oil and water.  Go figure.

In a story for the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, I make the case that the two cities need to pull together through an economic corridor along  I-94.

The story begins:

What is it about Milwaukee and Madison – that potent mix of mutual disdain, disregard and ignorance that characterizes their odd relationship?

“Only 80 miles separate them, but it’s like the cities are on different sides of the moon,” says James Rowen, who has worked in journalism and for mayors in both cities.

Mordecai Lee, a University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee political scientist who served for 12 years in the Legislature, offers another celestial view. “It’s the difference between Saturn and Jupiter. Milwaukee and Madison are on different planets,” he says. “Even as technology erases distances, the two cities remain impervious to cooperating.”

John Gurda, a Milwaukee historian and columnist for the Journal Sentinel, says Madison and Milwaukee are like estranged siblings who meet at Thanksgiving and then don’t talk for the rest of the year.

But enough metaphors – I have to blurt out something as loudly as I can.

Wisconsin needs Madison and Milwaukee to pull together.

Simply put, that 80-mile I-94 corridor traversing Milwaukee, Waukesha, Jefferson and Dane counties could be the muscle and brain of Wisconsin’s 21st century economic renaissance.

The four counties cover less than 5% of the state but have one-third of its population, 44% of its college graduates and almost 40% of Wisconsin jobs, according to the UW-Extension’s Center for Community and Economic Development. The synergy of a great transportation corridor connecting the state’s two largest metropolitan areas seems obvious.

Tom Hefty, the retired head of Blue Cross-Blue Shield United of Wisconsin, made that case 10 years ago when he tried – and failed – to persuade Gov. Jim Doyle to adopt a corridor development plan as part of the state’s economic strategy.

The logic: Milwaukee is the state’s finance and commercial capital. Madison is the political capital and home to a world-class research university. Waukesha County is a teeming entrepreneurial beehive. Already, a good chunk of workers travel back and forth along the corridor. Major educational facilities, including a rising UWM, prepare the workforce.

“You combine an academic powerhouse with a commercial powerhouse and you get job growth,” says Hefty.

Do you think that Wisconsin’s languishing economy could use more jobs? The answer is obvious, but the politics here are deeply dysfunctional. Talk about Mission Impossible. It’s not just Milwaukee vs. Madison, but their shared liberalism is abhorrent to conservative Waukesha County. Lambs will lie down with lions before corridor politicians ever work together.

In that context, Gov. Scott Walker’s decision to kill the $810 million federally funded train service between Milwaukee and Madison is just one more smack-down in that endless grudge match.

But here’s the thing: The corridor is coming together without those feuding politicians.

To read the rest of the story, please go here.

To read a similar argument I made for Chicago-to-Milwaukee connection, please go here.

 


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